The 7 Deadly Innocent Frauds of Economic Policy

Author:
Warren Mosler
Date Published:
08/13/2010
The presumption of innocence […] implies those perpetuating the fraud are not only wrong, but also not clever enough to understand what they are actually doing.

The term “innocent fraud” was introduced by Professor John Kenneth Galbraith in his last book, The Economics of Innocent Fraud, which he wrote at the age of ninety-four in 2004, just two years before he died. Professor Galbraith coined the term to describe a variety of incorrect assumptions embraced by mainstream economists, the media, and most of all, politicians.

The presumption of innocence, yet another example of Galbraith’s elegant and biting wit, implies those perpetuating the fraud are not only wrong, but also not clever enough to understand what they are actually doing. And any claim of prior understanding becomes an admission of deliberate fraud—an unthinkable self-incrimination.

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